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Thread: Read a banned book

  1. #1
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    Read a banned book

    It's Banned Book Week. If you're against censorship and support intellectual freedom, go out and read a banned book today. Below is a list of the “10 Most Challenged Books of 2005”.

    1. “It's Perfectly Normal” by Robie H Harris
    2. “Forever” by Judy Blume
    3. “The Catcher in the Rye” by J.D. Salinger
    4. “The Chocolate War” by Robert Cormier
    5. “Whale Talk” by Chris Crutcher
    6. “Detour for Emmy” by Marilyn Reynolds
    7. “What My Mother Doesn't Know” by Sonya Sones
    8. "Captain Underpants" (series) by Dave Pilkey
    9. "Crazy Lady!” by Jane Leslie Conly
    10. “It's So Amazing! A Book about Eggs, Sperm, Birth, Babies, and Families” by Robie H. Harris

    The American Library Association has a full list of 100 here: http://www.ala.org/ala/oif/bannedboo...frequently.htm
    “But who prays for Satan? Who, in eighteen centuries, has had the common humanity to pray for the one sinner that needed it most? ” ~ Mark Twain

    "Those who are easily shocked... should be shocked more often" ~ Mae West

  2. #2
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    I actually unblocked you just to read this one post..you should feel so lucky

    I just like how Huckleberry Finn...a book about racism being bad...is on the list

    I agree that teaching a social agenda is no good but come on...catcher and the rye, of mice and men, huck finn???? Those are extremely well written books.

    Some people are just out there.

  3. #3
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    Hmm, rather dissapointed I've only read 5 of those 100. Will have to try harder...
    And whom better to dispense such blatantly evident factoids but a self-appointed authority like myself?

    http://www.kevan.org/brain.cgi?Phunting

  4. #4
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    I thought it would be interesting to show what books on this list each of us has read. I'l ljust put mine in the order I see them on the list from top to bottom.

    Scary Stories (Series) by Alvin Schwartz
    The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
    Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck
    Harry Potter (Series) by J.K. Rowling
    (Those last ones are 4 of the top 10, I'm proud of myself )
    The Giver by Lois Lowry
    Goosebumps (Series) by R.L. Stine
    A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L'Engle
    The Witches by Roald Dahl
    To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
    The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton
    The Pigman by Paul Zindel
    Flowers for Algernon by Daniel Keyes
    A Light in the Attic by Shel Silverstein
    - You have got to be kidding me. Shel Silverstein is dangerous now?
    James and the Giant Peach by Roald Dahl- Holy hell
    The Anarchist Cookbook by William Powell- At #57 on the list? Are you joking? Apparantly Judy Blume and Shel Silverstein are more dangerous than making homemade napalm and learning how to make hallucinogens from bananas. These people have their priorities seriously messed up.
    Ordinary People by Judith Guest
    Where's Waldo? by Martin Hanford
    - Holy XXXX these people have lost their minds.
    How to Eat Fried Worms by Thomas Rockwell
    Jump Ship to Freedom by James Lincoln Collier and Christopher Collier


    Here's somethign I find interesting and very telling. These are a couple of books and where they fall on the list:
    40) What's Happening to my Body? Book for Girls: A Growing-Up Guide for Parents & Daughters by Lynda Madaras
    61) What's Happening to my Body? Book for Boys: A Growing-Up Guide for Parents & Sons by Lynda Madaras

    So, apparantly, it's bad for both boys and girls to know about their bodies, but it's even worse for girls.
    Truth gains more even by the errors of one who, with due study and preparation, thinks for himself, than by the true opinions of those who only hold them because they do not suffer themselves to think.
    -John Stuart Mill

  5. #5
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    I'm SO going to look for captain underpants. I don't know what it is, I've never heard of it, but the sole fact that it's on the list means that it must be so morally unhinging that it HAS to be a worthy read! xD
    Life may not be exactly pleasant, but it is at least not dull. Heave yourself into Hell today, and you may miss, tomorrow or next day, another Scopes trial, or another War to End War, or perchance a rich and buxom widow with all her first husband's clothes. There are always more Hardings hatching. I advocate hanging on as long as possible.
    H. L. Mencken

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    Quote Originally Posted by Master_Shake View Post
    I thought it would be interesting to show what books on this list each of us has read. I'l ljust put mine in the order I see them on the list from top to bottom.
    GREAT IDEA!

    I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou
    The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
    Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck
    Harry Potter (Series) by J.K. Rowling
    Forever by Judy Blume
    The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger
    The Color Purple by Alice Walker
    Sex by Madonna
    Earth's Children (Series) by Jean M. Auel
    Blubber by Judy Blume
    The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton
    Deenie by Judy Blume
    Flowers for Algernon by Daniel Keyes
    A Light in the Attic by Shel Silverstein
    Sleeping Beauty Trilogy by A.N. Roquelaure (Anne Rice)
    Are You There, God? It's Me, Margaret by Judy Blume
    The House of Spirits by Isabel Allende
    Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut
    Carrie by Stephen King
    Tiger Eyes by Judy Blume
    The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain
    Where's Waldo? by Martin Hanford
    Summer of My German Soldier by Bette Greene
    Little Black Sambo by Helen Bannerman

    Quote Originally Posted by Rovdak
    I'm SO going to look for captain underpants. I don't know what it is, I've never heard of it, but the sole fact that it's on the list means that it must be so morally unhinging that it HAS to be a worthy read! xD
    It's a kids book. Quite silly - but apparently silly is NOT OK.
    “But who prays for Satan? Who, in eighteen centuries, has had the common humanity to pray for the one sinner that needed it most? ” ~ Mark Twain

    "Those who are easily shocked... should be shocked more often" ~ Mae West

  7. #7
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    On a second look, I've actually read a few more:

    The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
    Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck
    The Witches by Roald Dahl
    The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood
    Beloved by Toni Morrison
    Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
    James and the Giant Peach by Roald Dahl
    American Psycho by Bret Easton Ellis
    Where's Waldo? by Martin Hanford

    Although I totally disagree with it, I can kinda understand why people may have a problem with some of those. But Where's Wally?! (or Waldo if you must be American) WTF?
    And whom better to dispense such blatantly evident factoids but a self-appointed authority like myself?

    http://www.kevan.org/brain.cgi?Phunting

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    Quote Originally Posted by jitobear View Post
    It's a kids book. Quite silly - but apparently silly is NOT OK.
    I was kind of expecting that tbh, I don't see what else it could be unless it's was some sourt of dressed-up xxx-rag

    I read of the linked list

    The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
    Harry Potter by J.K. Rowling (Just the 1st one)
    The Witches by Roald Dahl
    Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
    Cujo by Stephen King
    The Anarchist Cookbook by William Powell
    James and the Giant Peach by Roald Dahl
    Lord of the Flies by William Golding
    Carrie by Stephen King

    My list will grow massively if more Stephen King and/or Roald Dahl works are added.

    Lord of the Flies was a required read in High school :o
    Life may not be exactly pleasant, but it is at least not dull. Heave yourself into Hell today, and you may miss, tomorrow or next day, another Scopes trial, or another War to End War, or perchance a rich and buxom widow with all her first husband's clothes. There are always more Hardings hatching. I advocate hanging on as long as possible.
    H. L. Mencken

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Master_Shake View Post
    I thought it would be interesting to show what books on this list each of us has read. I'l ljust put mine in the order I see them on the list from top to bottom.
    5. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
    7. Harry Potter (Series) by J.K. Rowling
    13. The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger
    19. Sex by Madonna
    22. A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L'Engle
    25. In the Night Kitchen by Maurice Sendak
    41. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
    47. Flowers for Algernon by Daniel Keyes
    51. A Light in the Attic by Shel Silverstein
    52. Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
    53. Sleeping Beauty Trilogy by A.N. Roquelaure (Anne Rice)
    55. Cujo by Stephen King
    56. James and the Giant Peach by Roald Dahl
    57. The Anarchist Cookbook by William Powell
    70. Lord of the Flies by William Golding
    72. Women on Top: How Real Life Has Changed Women's Fantasies by Nancy Friday
    77. Carrie by Stephen King
    83. The Dead Zone by Stephen King
    84. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain
    88. Where's Waldo? by Martin Hanford
    96. How to Eat Fried Worms by Thomas Rockwell

    21 out of 100. Not too bad, could be better.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rovdak View Post
    Harry Potter by J.K. Rowling (Just the 1st one)
    Only the first one??! You need to get with the program friend
    Truth gains more even by the errors of one who, with due study and preparation, thinks for himself, than by the true opinions of those who only hold them because they do not suffer themselves to think.
    -John Stuart Mill

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    What? No one reads Henry Miller anymore?
    "They asked if I had found Jesus and I didn't even know He was missing."

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Master_Shake View Post
    Only the first one??! You need to get with the program friend
    I have so much to read... I'm afraid the first one didn't impress me enough to warrant followups, I've watched the movies
    Life may not be exactly pleasant, but it is at least not dull. Heave yourself into Hell today, and you may miss, tomorrow or next day, another Scopes trial, or another War to End War, or perchance a rich and buxom widow with all her first husband's clothes. There are always more Hardings hatching. I advocate hanging on as long as possible.
    H. L. Mencken

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rovdak View Post
    I have so much to read... I'm afraid the first one didn't impress me enough to warrant followups, I've watched the movies
    I have read the rest, and your initial take is pretty well founded. I'm glad her books have turned alot of kids on to reading and all that, but there is alot better out there. On the other hand, there's nothing like being told that reading something is wrong to make me want to go out and get a copy, if for no other reason than to see what the big deal is, and to irk the censors.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kronus View Post
    there's nothing like being told that reading something is wrong to make me want to go out and get a copy, if for no other reason than to see what the big deal is
    That's why I read the first one, I wanted to know what the fuss was all about, 'nothing' was my conclusion really so I moved along and sank my teeth into Herbert's Dune series.
    Life may not be exactly pleasant, but it is at least not dull. Heave yourself into Hell today, and you may miss, tomorrow or next day, another Scopes trial, or another War to End War, or perchance a rich and buxom widow with all her first husband's clothes. There are always more Hardings hatching. I advocate hanging on as long as possible.
    H. L. Mencken

  15. #15
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    James and the Giant Peach by Roald Dahl- Holy hell
    I did a book report on this one in 3rd or 4th grade (or sometime back then)...If I recall correctly there was nothing wrong with the book. I've read all of Roald Dahls books....incredible.

    How is "To Kill a Mockingbird" on there?

    Are you sure this list is for real or has school just gone to complete XXXX since I was there?

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