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Thread: Check out this grille

  1. #1
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    Check out this grille

    This is The Original Truck Grille...cooks all day at camp...or anywhere it goes.








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  2. #2
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    Looks like it does a nice job. What did you use to treat the exposed metal?
    - Which is worse--ignorance or apathy? For my part, I don't know and I don't care. -

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by billsco View Post
    Looks like it does a nice job. What did you use to treat the exposed metal?
    When it was completed in 1983, the exterior was painted (all but the flat surfaces used for cooking...they were polished to shiny metal and coated with cooking oil) with heat resistant flat black grill-paint. It was moved across several states and used infrequently to the point of building up a coat of rust until recently when it was sanded and coated with bacon fat and lard while extremely hot.

    The next phase includes bead-blasting and repainting.
    Last edited by jim's trucking; 09-20-2006 at 09:55 AM.
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  4. #4
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    Could you share the recipe for that pork loin? Looks great.

    I have to take exception to the water bottle in the picture. Grilling jobs require real refreshment--beer.
    - Which is worse--ignorance or apathy? For my part, I don't know and I don't care. -

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by billsco View Post
    Could you share the recipe for that pork loin? Looks great.

    I have to take exception to the water bottle in the picture. Grilling jobs require real refreshment--beer.
    It was great!

    First, you steal a large pig...

    The water was for sprinkling on the coals when I cooked a steak in mid-afternoon...also for cooling the top hotplates when they get too hot to fry eggs. I also added a bit of water and wine to the juice pan for basting late in the cooking.

    I prefer Scotch!

    Try this dry rub: (Use exact measurements...adding cayenne because you like hot stuff will likely ruin it for others. You can always add cayenne to your portion of the finished product.)

    2tbs kosher salt (never iodized)
    2tbs raw Hawaiian sugar
    2tbs brown sugar
    2tbs ground cumin seed
    2tbs chili powder (pure...not with garlic, etc added)
    2tbs cracked black pepper
    1tbs cayenne pepper (60HU)
    4tbs Hungarian paprika
    2tbs ground sage

    makes about 1 cup...enough for a humongous roast.

    This is also good to sprinkle on cooked meat just prior to eating...even works great on a cheezeburger if you don't sprinkle too heavy.

    Pat roast dry of any liquids. Rub the above mixture into all surfaces of the roast...twice. If you're lucky enough to find a pork loin roast with a thin layer of fat on one side, cook with the fat side up so the renderings run down into the meat. Add some fresh ground black pepper to the top side only and close the grill, have several drinks, maybe a romp in the sack with a hot vixen, watch some TV, get on the internet...check the roast about every hour. (The way my grill is made, I don't really lose much heat when I open the door periodically...the grill walls are 3/8" thick mild steel and it gets hot all over. If yours loses a lot of heat when opened, don't check it too often.)

    The grill as set up in the pictures cooks the meat from the top down. If you're cooking in a standard grill, arrange the hot coals to be on both sides of the meat and use a pan under the meat with the meat held above the pan on a wire screen. Don't let the meat sit in the collecting juices.

    Baste with the juices in the last few hours (I cooked that one for 7 hours using an entire 20# bag of Kingsford Mesquite charcoal and Mesquite chips I had soaked in water for about three hours...dumped on the coals by the handfuls every so often.) Next trial will be Kingsford regular charcoal and Hickory chips.

    I'll let you know which one the neighbors (and the neighbor's dog) like better!
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  6. #6
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    Thanks! Sounds delicious.
    - Which is worse--ignorance or apathy? For my part, I don't know and I don't care. -

  7. #7
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    Everything sounds good, except I always soak my woodchips in Applejack. Give just a hint of flavor, but it is spectacular. For fish, I often soak them in a heavier white wine (usually a cheap, very oaky chardonnay).
    "Guns don't kill people, people kill people, and monkeys do too (if they have a gun)". -Eddie Izzard

    Long is the way
    And hard, that out of Hell leads up to Light. -Milton

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