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Thread: My Gardening Advice

  1. #1
    John Milosevic Guest

    My Gardening Advice

    I have been a gardener for years. I have always been known to have the greenest lawn on my street in Washington D.C.
    Here are some tips of mine.
    1. Rake grass before summer, and before fall. Rake the leaves, rake the dead loose grass up.
    2. Put a winterizer down before winter. (If accesible, I recomend going to a menards and getting Winterizer and Weed control) Or get something that not only helps the grass, but kills weeds so next year, weeds are not a hassle.
    3. During late may, early June, put some sort of lawn food down. (Lime, Menards premium lawn food, or get some Miracle grow soil and spread it over the lawn. The nutrients in all three provide excellent nitrogen and minerals for the grass.
    4. Get up in the morning if you know it wil be hot that day, and water the grass by hand or with a sprinkler and just wet the grass enough to get it by a few hours of the day.
    Later if you have time, water the grass before bed.
    5. Don't cut your grass to short. This will release to much sunlight into the roots thereby killing the grass. Cut the grass to the size of a inch. Maybe two.
    6. If your lawn becomes weedy, I have a personal remedy I created and it works on my lawn. I put a dab of shampoo in a sprayer with a tiny bit of tonic water, and a little amonia. This will not harm your lawn.
    If you have additional questions on lawn care, e-mail me or write me on the site.
    -John Hetrev Milosevic

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Reading, UK
    Posts
    1,242
    What is your favourite colour of grass?

    -Wez

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Lincoln : England
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    1,876
    I shall ask my lawn to e-mail John Milosevic and seek his advice the next time it feels 'under the weather'.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Oregon
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    7,012
    I've never derived pleasure from propagating something that is inedible, seasonal, has limited visual appeal and requires regular maintenance. I can pinpoint the origin of that position to age 8-10, when I used a hand mower, hand clippers, hand rake and labor to trim summer lawns for $.35/ea (USD) with owners eagerly pointing out any stray blade of grass. My real introduction to capitalism.

    My wife, our landscape designer and interior decorator, has on occasion demanded some lawn area at our various residences for balance purposes, and I readily concede to her expertise. My involvement with lawn has, fortunately, evolved to writing a monthly check to pay the gardener.
    These are my principles. If you don't like them I have others. ~Groucho Marx~

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    178
    Quote Originally Posted by John Milosevic
    Here are some tips of mine.
    4. Get up in the morning if you know it wil be hot that day, and water the grass by hand or with a sprinkler and just wet the grass enough to get it by a few hours of the day.
    Later if you have time, water the grass before bed.
    5. Don't cut your grass to short. This will release to much sunlight into the roots thereby killing the grass. Cut the grass to the size of a inch. Maybe two.
    Not sure what geographical region you're addessing, but neither of these tips seems appropriate to Florida. The most commonly planted turfgrass here is St. Augustine. Mowing it to a height of 'an inch, or maybe two' will likely lead to multiple problems. Pest problems, weed problems, and reduced density and vigor. It also increases the cost of maintenance, since it elevates the need for water and fertilizer. Frequent unnecessary mowing also has adverse environmental consequences. The general recommendation is to cut St. Augustine at a height of 3 to 4 inches, no lower than 4" during periods of moisture stress or if it's growing in shade. This height will help the grass develop a deeper root system and make the lawn more attractive.

    The recommendation for lightly wetting the grass during the hot day followed by more watering at bedtime also seems contrary to good cultivation practices. Light waterings are not only inefficient but encourage a shallow root system, making the lawn more vulnerable to moisture stress. Also, watering at night will extend the time the lawn is naturally wet from dew, making disease problems more likely. The best time to water is in the early morning when there's minimal waste from evaporation. Many turfgrasses can handle a good bit of moisture stress without permanent damage, so watering should be done--and done deeply--on an as-needed basis. Assuming no rainfall, the recommendation in Florida is to water every 10-14 days during winter and about twice a week during summer.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Dublin, Ireland
    Posts
    811
    There is little this man is not an expert on.

    I think he means grass in the "bob Marley" way
    There was a demon that lived in the air. They said whoever challenged him would die. Their controls would freeze up, their planes would buffet wildly, and they would disintegrate. The demon lived at Mach 1 on the meter, seven hundred and fifty miles an hour, where the air could no longer move out of the way. He lived behind a barrier through which they said no man could ever pass. They called it the sound barrier.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Oregon
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    7,012
    Quote Originally Posted by Mucusaur
    There is little this man is not an expert on.

    I think he means grass in the "bob Marley" way
    Things have loosened up if he can have his front yard full of it in Washington DC.
    These are my principles. If you don't like them I have others. ~Groucho Marx~

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    996
    To avoid any possibility of over exertion from maintenance of my yard, I always write the checks sitting down.
    Dono
    That we are to stand by the president, right or wrong is not only unpatriotic and servile, but is morally treasonable to the American public.
    Theodore Roosevelt

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