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Thread: Toyota November U.S. Retail Sales Beating Ford, Beating Chrysler and Closing In On GM

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    Toyota November U.S. Retail Sales Beating Ford, Beating Chrysler and Closing In On GM

    http://www.theautochannel.com/news/2...18/148526.html

    The end is near for GM, Ford.

    DETROIT, Nov 18, 2005; Reuters reported that Toyota Motor Corp. grabbed more U.S. retail market share than Ford Motor Co. in early November and it was less than one share point behind General Motors Corp., J.D. Power and Associates said on Friday.

    snip

    GM and Ford both reported 23 percent declines in their U.S. sales last month, as high gasoline prices hurt demand for their big sport utility vehicles and industrywide sales fell to their slowest pace in seven years.

    DaimlerChrysler was in fourth place in early November, with a retail share of 13.6 percent, while Honda Motor Co. Ltd. (7267.T: Quote, Profile, Research) took the No. 5 spot with a 12.2 percent share.

    Nissan Motor Co. Ltd., which suffered a 13 percent decline in October sales, appears to be in line for more disappointing results in November, according to the Power Information Network. It said Nissan's retail sales were down 15 percent from the same period last year and its share was holding flat at 7.8 percent.
    Admittedly, the concept of the Straussian text is one susceptible to intellectual mischief in the form of wild claims about the esoteric meaning of texts, not to mention rather off-putting for anyone who doesn’t like know-it-all elites.
    Orthodox Judaism, not to mention other religions: there is a small number of men who know the detailed truth; the masses are told what they need to know and no more

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    GM shares have lost 46% in 2005, any CEO's nightmare. When market cap shrinks like that, the only issue is how long cash will last as equity based revolving credit facilities are way underwater.
    These are my principles. If you don't like them I have others. ~Groucho Marx~

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    THey won't go outta business though. Remember Chrysler back in the day.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steeeeve
    THey won't go outta business though. Remember Chrysler back in the day.
    Chrysler wasn't GM and our economy was still industrial based in that era. But what an impact on consumer confidence. A majority of the public pays no attention to anything but what I'd term mindless entertainment and issues they feel directly affect them that need scratching. GM going into chapter reorganization would bring headlines on a par with December 7, 1941. 'As goes GM goes the nation'
    These are my principles. If you don't like them I have others. ~Groucho Marx~

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    Quote Originally Posted by georged
    Chrysler wasn't GM and our economy was still industrial based in that era. But what an impact on consumer confidence. A majority of the public pays no attention to anything but what I'd term mindless entertainment and issues they feel directly affect them that need scratching. GM going into chapter reorganization would bring headlines on a par with December 7, 1941. 'As goes GM goes the nation'
    Come on though, you don't actually think GM will go outta business do you? I'm not saying they will get bailed out but I don't think they will go under.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steeeeve
    Come on though, you don't actually think GM will go outta business do you? I'm not saying they will get bailed out but I don't think they will go under.
    I don't profess to know what will happen. From what I can judge by their current financial position with steady loss of market share, shedding benefit liabilities and drastically reducing labor costs is about their only option. How they'll accomplish that without forced reorganization is anybody's guess. They certainly haven't been able to do it on their own.

    When your equity takes that big of a drop accompanied by higher borrowing costs with declining market share, I don't care who you are because your circumstances become very serious.
    These are my principles. If you don't like them I have others. ~Groucho Marx~

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    fair enough,

    I'm doing a few valuation models on Sirius radio right now...talk about a company that can go bankrupt in a split second.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steeeeve
    fair enough,

    I'm doing a few valuation models on Sirius radio right now...talk about a company that can go bankrupt in a split second.
    That industry has a future in a consumer dominated service economy. I'd think there are people waiting for it to fall to pick up the pieces. Look at cable TVs start and recapitalizations. Who would want GM as it is? As I've said, it needs blood flowing in the halls and modern management to save it.
    These are my principles. If you don't like them I have others. ~Groucho Marx~

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    Quote Originally Posted by georged
    That industry has a future in a consumer dominated service economy. I'd think there are people waiting for it to fall to pick up the pieces. Look at cable TVs start and recapitalizations. Who would want GM as it is? As I've said, it needs blood flowing in the halls and modern management to save it.
    yeah, I agree...might take awhlie

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steeeeve
    THey won't go outta business though. Remember Chrysler back in the day.

    Contrary to popular belief, Chrysler was not in long term danger of going under. Chrysler's problem was a cash flow problem. Their sales were still reasonable, and there was great potential in the company. As an accountant, you should understand the impact that a poor cash management strategy can have.

    American automakers problem now is that they are simply uncompetitive. This is not a cash flow problem that can be solved with a bailout. The entire industry is shot. American automakers have a reputation for poor quality. Their product lines do not meet the demands of the modern consumer, and their legacy costs are outrageous, which quite frankly is their own damn fault.

    The simple fact of the matter is American automakers have been mismanaged for so many years that they are self destructing.
    If ye love wealth greater than liberty, the tranquility of servitude greater than the animating contest for freedom, go home from us in peace. We seek not your counsel, nor your arms. Crouch down and lick the hand that feeds you; May your chains set lightly upon you, and may posterity forget that ye were our countrymen. —Samuel Adams

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    Quote Originally Posted by daewoo
    Contrary to popular belief, Chrysler was not in long term danger of going under. Chrysler's problem was a cash flow problem. Their sales were still reasonable, and there was great potential in the company. As an accountant, you should understand the impact that a poor cash management strategy can have.

    American automakers problem now is that they are simply uncompetitive. This is not a cash flow problem that can be solved with a bailout. The entire industry is shot. American automakers have a reputation for poor quality. Their product lines do not meet the demands of the modern consumer, and their legacy costs are outrageous, which quite frankly is their own damn fault.

    The simple fact of the matter is American automakers have been mismanaged for so many years that they are self destructing.
    I'm not saying a bailout will solve it...im just saying I don't think they will go under and if worst comes to worse the government might do something.

    However, Chyrlser had more then cash flow problems..they had poor sales which due to the gas thing and it just was the straw that broke the camels back.

    Oh, and finanacial analyists are more interested in cash flow then the accountant

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steeeeve
    I'm not saying a bailout will solve it...im just saying I don't think they will go under and if worst comes to worse the government might do something.
    Like what? Throwing money att he problem is unlikely to do anything at all to fix the problem. Passing a bill banning imported automobiles, or heavily tarrifing them, is not really an option since the American public is not likely to take such measures lightly in a period of negative salary growth.

    However, Chyrlser had more then cash flow problems..they had poor sales which due to the gas thing and it just was the straw that broke the camels back.
    Those were well recognized and easily corrected short term problems. tehy needed to update their offerings. Several of their plants had already bee retooled for their new line of offerings, and they simply needed the cash flow to keep operating until they saw some return.

    Oh, and finanacial analyists are more interested in cash flow then the accountant
    I just said you should understand it. I do not think I would hire an accountant who was clueless as to the importance of a good cash management strategy
    If ye love wealth greater than liberty, the tranquility of servitude greater than the animating contest for freedom, go home from us in peace. We seek not your counsel, nor your arms. Crouch down and lick the hand that feeds you; May your chains set lightly upon you, and may posterity forget that ye were our countrymen. —Samuel Adams

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    haha it used to be earnings that were the thing but now, you are right, it seems to be all about the cash flows. However, I don't know why you would want an accountant to know this (unless you are a small business). Otherwise accountants just deal with the past.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steeeeve
    haha it used to be earnings that were the thing but now, you are right, it seems to be all about the cash flows. However, I don't know why you would want an accountant to know this (unless you are a small business). Otherwise accountants just deal with the past.
    Unless there has been a massive shift from accrual to cash based accounting taht I am unaware of, I would think that having accountants with at least a basic understanding of cash management would be pretty important. Is sucha shift in basic paradigm has not taken place, it would seem to me that an accoutnant who is concerned only with the past would be searching for a job in short order, since accounts payable are just as important as accounts due (since they are essentially already on the books), and it is that little hole in between which is truly important.

    Unless, of course, you are just a tax accountant, in which case the past is all that matters.
    If ye love wealth greater than liberty, the tranquility of servitude greater than the animating contest for freedom, go home from us in peace. We seek not your counsel, nor your arms. Crouch down and lick the hand that feeds you; May your chains set lightly upon you, and may posterity forget that ye were our countrymen. —Samuel Adams

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    This just in, GM cuts 30.000 jobs:

    http://money.cnn.com/2005/11/21/news...ex.htm?cnn=yes

    I guess this move would make Toyota the biggest in the US.

    Whether or not it will save GM is a different story alltogether...
    Eh, what's this? A Republican from Texas that actually makes sense and can speak English?

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