Poll: Do pop singers have a right to call themselves musicians?

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 22 of 22

Thread: Do pop singers have a right to call themselves musicians?

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Western Pennsylvania
    Posts
    773
    Quote Originally Posted by gansao View Post
    I know what you are saying but I think Lady GaGa's music is fabulous ,if not original..
    I only have to say that Metal bands would never get away with this. Once Metallica, Megadeth, Motorhead, etc. are gone, there will never again be a band with their exact same style, because metal and rock are always progressing, always on the move. Pop music today is the same stuff people were listening to 30 years ago, it's redundant.
    "A government big enough to give you everything you want is a government big enough to take from you everything you have." ~ Gerald Ford

    "What one person receives without working for, another person must work for without receiving." ~ Adrian Rogers

    Support gun control: hit your target when shooting!

    I regret my user name.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Limeyland
    Posts
    7,893
    Quote Originally Posted by COBHC View Post
    I only have to say that Metal bands would never get away with this. Once Metallica, Megadeth, Motorhead, etc. are gone, there will never again be a band with their exact same style, because metal and rock are always progressing, always on the move. Pop music today is the same stuff people were listening to 30 years ago, it's redundant.
    I agree........

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Near Paris.
    Posts
    70
    Quote Originally Posted by JPSartre12 View Post
    I voted YES. I don't know how you can classify people such as Isao Tomita as anything other than a musician. He just happens to play an electronic synthesizer instead of a guitar or piano. .
    I love Tomita's work. I own two or three LPs from back in the days, including "The pictures at the exhibition".

    He does not really fit on this thread indeed, besides being mentioned as a good musician/creative individual in opposition to "pop" mainstream people.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Near Paris.
    Posts
    70
    I've been a little unplugged from the music scene, "pop"-wise, and I don't really know what's happening on the french scene and in other countries. Although I'm still quite young, I always liked records that have lived enough, second-hand LPs and stuff. That explains why I love Black Sabbath, Mandrill and lots of other oldies.

    But what I hear from time to time in stores or on TV when I visit people's homes is not always devoid of talent or creativity. Mainstream will always be mainstream of course, in the sense that 90% of what's broadcasted sounds like what you heard ten years ago, but with another make-up and wear fashion. Maybe bigger breasts? Not even that, Kate Moss still has some followers. I liked when they had some flesh on.

    Many obscure but highly talented musicians wind up playing boring bass lines or mimicking drums in the back of a stage. That's the reality of the profession, for a large part. It also seems that when you're into the business, you don't see the same things as simple consumers do. I don't know exactly how Stevie Wonder was considered in the middle of the seventies when he was at his highest peak of creativity and success. But the "thank you" section of the booklet going with "Songs in the key of life" mentions many talented people including Frank Zappa. Though Zappa had success himself, it's obvious that his music and his discourse was not of the same kind. Wonder was much more mainstream, I believe. But I can be wrong, as I wasn't born by 1975.

    As I have already stressed, I like the bands presented today as the originators of a certain heavy form of Rock and roll, such as Black Sabbath, Deep Purple and Led Zeppelin. When I bought the "In Rock" DP album, I was amused to see a large sticker with the purple capitals: "POP MUSIC". Same thing for Black Sabbath. I had never heard something heavier than the intro to this album before! Intro that had been , by the way, suppressed for the US version of the LP.

    Actually, designations like "pop", "metal" or whatever are just convenient ways to find your record in a store or in your personal collection. Of course, there are purely heavy metal bands and rap or jazz bands, but there are also so many bridges between them.
    Last edited by olivortex; 02-11-2010 at 07:14 AM.

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Near Paris.
    Posts
    70

    I voted YES but...

    I voted YES but it depends on who you're talking about.

    Britney Spears is NOT an artist.

    The Black Eyed Peas sounded not bad at all to me the first time I heard them, some years ago. Today I find they make pure teenage XXXX.

    Sometimes the strict opposite happens: there was this freaky person, who came out of our own "american idol" who sings marvelously with great taste for covering standards.

  6. #21
    JPSartre12 Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by olivortex View Post
    I've been a little unplugged from the music scene, "pop"-wise, and I don't really know what's happening on the french scene and in other countries. Although I'm still quite young, I always liked records that have lived enough, second-hand LPs and stuff. That explains why I love Black Sabbath, Mandrill and lots of other oldies.

    But what I hear from time to time in stores or on TV when I visit people's homes is not always devoid of talent or creativity. Mainstream will always be mainstream of course, in the sense that 90% of what's broadcasted sounds like what you heard ten years ago, but with another make-up and wear fashion. Maybe bigger breasts? Not even that, Kate Moss still has some followers. I liked when they had some flesh on.

    Many obscure but highly talented musicians wind up playing boring bass lines or mimicking drums in the back of a stage. That's the reality of the profession, for a large part. It also seems that when you're into the business, you don't see the same things as simple consumers do. I don't know exactly how Stevie Wonder was considered in the middle of the seventies when he was at his highest peak of creativity and success. But the "thank you" section of the booklet going with "Songs in the key of life" mentions many talented people including Frank Zappa. Though Zappa had success himself, it's obvious that his music and his discourse was not of the same kind. Wonder was much more mainstream, I believe. But I can be wrong, as I wasn't born by 1975.

    As I have already stressed, I like the bands presented today as the originators of a certain heavy form of Rock and roll, such as Black Sabbath, Deep Purple and Led Zeppelin. When I bought the "In Rock" DP album, I was amused to see a large sticker with the purple capitals: "POP MUSIC". Same thing for Black Sabbath. I had never heard something heavier than the intro to this album before! Intro that had been , by the way, suppressed for the US version of the LP.

    Actually, designations like "pop", "metal" or whatever are just convenient ways to find your record in a store or in your personal collection. Of course, there are purely heavy metal bands and rap or jazz bands, but there are also so many bridges between them.
    Considering Black Sabbath "pop" certainly is a stretch. And the first time I heard Black Sabbath, the song, it was new and I was a young teen. I immediately became a fan and have been for many decades.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    3
    Music seems to have stopped evolving since the 80's and early 90's. Same old melodies and beats over and over again. But you cant blame the pop singers you have to blame ourselves, we buy the magazines that have front pages full of Britney's crotch shots and as a result perpetuate the publicity that these 'artists' thrive on. Some, like Lady Gaga, have a unique sense of borrowed style, but are relatively innovative and fresh compared to the likes of Hannah Montana. That is regardless of whether you like the direction Gaga's music and 'culture' is taking us.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •